Art Printing vs. Canvas Printing: What’s the Difference?
Art Printing vs. Canvas Printing: What’s the Difference?
July 12, 2022
How To Create High-Quality Canvas Prints That Sell
How To Create High-Quality Canvas Prints That Sell
July 12, 2022

What Is Archival Pigment Ink & Why Is It Better?

For true professionals in the fine arts and photography world, creating prints of pieces that took many hours can seem like a stressful process. How can a print truly capture the hard work that went into the original? The best way to ensure your work is thoughtfully recreated is to create prints using the highest quality materials possible, which is where archival pigment inks come in. This article will dive deeper into what archival pigment ink is and why it’s the better choice for you. What Is Archival Pigment Ink? The purpose of archival pigment ink is clear in its name—it’s designed to create something that lasts long enough that it could be archived for a long time without degradation. Specifically, archival pigment ink is made from solid, opaque pigments suspended in an ink solution. These solid particles provide the color of the ink and are extremely color-fast compared to something less permanent like a dye. The ink’s color is determined by the crystalline structure of the pigments that float inside it. Why Do I Want To Use Archival Pigment Ink? Now that we know what archival pigment ink is, let’s discuss why it is better than its alternatives. For a professional artist or photographer, archival pigment ink is the only choice to ensure a print lasts as long as possible and looks its absolute best. Below are some of archival pigment ink’s best qualities. Long-Lasting Prints An average, everyday ink is fine for most people, but it will start to fade in a relatively short amount of time. Because of their crystalline structure and solid particles, archival pigment inks don’t fade anywhere near as fast as typical inks do. Prints made with archival pigment ink can often last entire lifetimes without fading as long as they are well taken care of. Powerfully Bonds to Paper Besides their ability to resist fading over time, archival pigment inks also create an immensely powerful bond between them and the paper they are printed on. The chemical composition of the ink, as well as the method of printing with it, helps ensure that the bond between paper and ink is incredibly strong. This bond is important for resisting the effects of warping and moisture over time. Intense Coloration While the long-lasting nature of archival pigment inks is one of their greatest strengths, so too is their overall vibrancy and intense coloration. Trying to use regular ink to recreate a painting made through the use of pigment-heavy mediums like oil paint will never fully capture the color quality of the original piece. With archival pigment ink, however, it becomes much easier to create a print that retains the subtle color balances of the original. For fine art printing services that you can trust to create incredible prints, turn to The Stackhouse. We’ll help you create prints of your work that you’ll be excited to share with the world.

For true professionals in the fine arts and photography world, creating prints of pieces that took many hours can seem like a stressful process. How can a print truly capture the hard work that went into the original? The best way to ensure your work is thoughtfully recreated is to create prints using the highest quality materials possible, which is where archival pigment inks come in. This article will dive deeper into what archival pigment ink is and why it’s the better choice for you. What Is Archival Pigment Ink? The purpose of archival pigment ink is clear in its name—it’s designed to create something that lasts long enough that it could be archived for a long time without degradation. Specifically, archival pigment ink is made from solid, opaque pigments suspended in an ink solution. These solid particles provide the color of the ink and are extremely color-fast compared to something less permanent like a dye. The ink’s color is determined by the crystalline structure of the pigments that float inside it. Why Do I Want To Use Archival Pigment Ink? Now that we know what archival pigment ink is, let’s discuss why it is better than its alternatives. For a professional artist or photographer, archival pigment ink is the only choice to ensure a print lasts as long as possible and looks its absolute best. Below are some of archival pigment ink’s best qualities. Long-Lasting Prints An average, everyday ink is fine for most people, but it will start to fade in a relatively short amount of time. Because of their crystalline structure and solid particles, archival pigment inks don’t fade anywhere near as fast as typical inks do. Prints made with archival pigment ink can often last entire lifetimes without fading as long as they are well taken care of. Powerfully Bonds to Paper Besides their ability to resist fading over time, archival pigment inks also create an immensely powerful bond between them and the paper they are printed on. The chemical composition of the ink, as well as the method of printing with it, helps ensure that the bond between paper and ink is incredibly strong. This bond is important for resisting the effects of warping and moisture over time. Intense Coloration While the long-lasting nature of archival pigment inks is one of their greatest strengths, so too is their overall vibrancy and intense coloration. Trying to use regular ink to recreate a painting made through the use of pigment-heavy mediums like oil paint will never fully capture the color quality of the original piece. With archival pigment ink, however, it becomes much easier to create a print that retains the subtle color balances of the original. For fine art printing services that you can trust to create incredible prints, turn to The Stackhouse. We’ll help you create prints of your work that you’ll be excited to share with the world.For true professionals in the fine arts and photography world, creating prints of pieces that took many hours can seem like a stressful process. How can a print truly capture the hard work that went into the original? The best way to ensure your work is thoughtfully recreated is to create prints using the highest quality materials possible, which is where archival pigment inks come in. This article will dive deeper into what archival pigment ink is and why it’s the better choice for you.

What Is Archival Pigment Ink?

The purpose of archival pigment ink is clear in its name—it’s designed to create something that lasts long enough that it could be archived for a long time without degradation. Specifically, archival pigment ink is made from solid, opaque pigments suspended in an ink solution. These solid particles provide the color of the ink and are extremely color-fast compared to something less permanent like a dye. The ink’s color is determined by the crystalline structure of the pigments that float inside it.

Why Do I Want To Use Archival Pigment Ink?

Now that we know what archival pigment ink is, let’s discuss why it is better than its alternatives. For a professional artist or photographer, archival pigment ink is the only choice to ensure a print lasts as long as possible and looks its absolute best. Below are some of archival pigment ink’s best qualities.

Long-Lasting Prints

An average, everyday ink is fine for most people, but it will start to fade in a relatively short amount of time. Because of their crystalline structure and solid particles, archival pigment inks don’t fade anywhere near as fast as typical inks do. Prints made with archival pigment ink can often last entire lifetimes without fading as long as they are well taken care of.

Powerfully Bonds to Paper

Besides their ability to resist fading over time, archival pigment inks also create an immensely powerful bond between them and the paper they are printed on. The chemical composition of the ink, as well as the method of printing with it, helps ensure that the bond between paper and ink is incredibly strong. This bond is important for resisting the effects of warping and moisture over time.

Intense Coloration

While the long-lasting nature of archival pigment inks is one of their greatest strengths, so too is their overall vibrancy and intense coloration. Trying to use regular ink to recreate a painting made through the use of pigment-heavy mediums like oil paint will never fully capture the color quality of the original piece. With archival pigment ink, however, it becomes much easier to create a print that retains the subtle color balances of the original.

For fine art printing services that you can trust to create incredible prints, turn to The Stackhouse. We’ll help you create prints of your work that you’ll be excited to share with the world.

Christopher
Christopher
I am the owner/operator of the Stackhouse. I have over 10 years of experience in art reproduction and e-commerce.

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